Archive for July, 2013

Business Supporters

Every author needs support. My husband, bless his heart, is my strongest promoter. My Critters are three talented authors and together we plot new stories and critique our drafts. The Bunchers are my street team. They edit my drafted work, find those pesky commas, talk about my books in the community, and bunch together for lunch. My newest team are my Kidders.

Four adorable young adults, who are technological wizards, save my business and sanity. They often use Face Time to conquer my fears of changing this website and tracking my sales. They manage to crop my gorgeous Rebel Ink Press book covers to use on Facebook and Twitter. 

My Kidders also enjoy teasing me about the romantic suspense genre. They’ll often quote lines from my books in a melodramatic manner that has the family enjoying the euphoria that develops from a healthy belly laugh. “…tall tightly muscled Joseph Sutton…” (from Swamp Run) or “Down on one knee, missy.” (from Swamp Secret).  

Yes, they are my kids; two daughters, one son-in-law and one BBF (best boyfriend).

I love my Critters, Bunchers, and Kidders.

Enough.

Read Full Post »

Murder in July

Dear Readers,

Successful scenes are found not created. Oh, they may be altered, beautified or horrified but still, they’re found. They may be read in a fictional format such as a book or hopefully less often, in a non fictional sense such as an home invasion or a war. Sometimes, however, a patriotic celebration might be an answer to a romantic suspense writer’s question concerning her main character’s conflict.

In Swamp Home, hopefully my third novel, Cain McIver’s main conflict or flaw is revenge. He really wants revenge but he first needs to solve his brother’s murder. What better way to cover over the sound of the fatal gun shots than fireworks?

My muse, the swamps and lake town, celebrate our nation’s birth by staging a spontaneous and impromptu fireworks competition. Sitting on the piers in close proximity would remind readers of a war zone in some novels.

In mine, Cain McIver’s brother, Chad, could have been murdered in the tall weeds on the limestone bluff just as several neighbors burn their money on expensive out-of-state explosives. The numerous colors and designs reflect on the large oval lake and keep the attention of any possible witnesses.

This author’s problem is I’ve already finished the first draft and revision. Should I write a new first chapter and float the others up a number? Would that work? How do you feel about prologues? Do they work better? Will my editor and readers feel the explosive scene I found or will they think I created it? Time will tell an explosive tale.

Enough.

Read Full Post »